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COPE Crisis Hotline: 1-800-542-2673

Frequently Asked Questions

Intensive In-home Services
Intensive Outpatient Family Therapy Services
Intensive Care Coordination
School-based Therapeutic Day Treatment
Crisis Stabilization Services
Case Management
Strategic Family Mentoring

Intensive In-home Services

What are Intensive In-home Services?
Intensive in-home services consist of home-based and family-centered counseling for children/adolescents who are at risk of out-of-home placement due to their behaviors.

Services are intense and are provided from 3 to 10 hours per week to the child and family in their homes, schools, and sometimes at Middle Peninsula-Northern Neck Community Services Board (MPNNCSB) outpatient clinics or agencies in the community where the child and family are involved.

The child's residence, as the setting for the services, is more likely to be successful than a clinical setting.

Who is eligible for the services?
Children who have mental, behavioral, or emotional illness, are at risk of out-of-home placement due to their clinical needs, and need services more intensive than outpatient clinic care are eligible if they also meet at least two of the following criteria:
  • Have difficulty in establishing or maintaining normal interpersonal relationships to a degree that they are at risk of hospitalization or out-of-home placement because of conflicts with family or community
  • Exhibit such inappropriate behavior that repeated interventions by mental health, social services, or judicial system are necessary
  • Exhibit difficulty in cognitive ability such that they are unable to recognize personal danger or significantly inappropriate social behavior. For example, a child who is acting out in such a fashion that there is risk of harm to herself/himself or to others
Who pays for the services?
Medicaid and CSA (Comprehensive Services Act) funds that are approved by the FAPT (Family Assessment and Planning Team) and CPMT (Community Policy and Management Team) pay for these services.

Our child has been hospitalized many times when he becomes a danger to himself or others. How do intensive in-home services address that situation?
Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance may need to be hospitalized. We work closely with the family to manage the child's symptomatic behavior without hospitalization, if possible, by implementing a structured plan to avoid a hospital stay. Therapists and supervisors are available 24/7 to monitor and assist. However, if a structured plan cannot be implemented with the parents and family, therapists arrange for prescreening with MPNNCSB staff and admission to a hospital.

Why should the family manage a psychiatric emergency when the child's behavior can be managed more safely in a hospital?
Family and/or caretakers are often in the best position to identify triggers of crises within the home environment. MPNNCSB staff can often guide them to change patterns that may contribute to emergency situations. Parents or caretakers, assisted by MPNNCSB staff, can then make a significant systemic change that may ultimately reduce or potentially even eliminate the child's serious emotional and behavioral problems.

May parents request intensive in-home services?
No, not directly. Community members such as FAPT (Family Assessment and Planning Team) members, school counselors, therapists, social workers, or probation officers, must provide those referrals.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Rachel Teagle
Youth and Family Services Coordinator
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

Intensive Outpatient Family Therapy Services

My child has just received a referral for intensive outpatient family therapy services. What does that mean for our family?
Children who need more frequent and intense therapy than outpatient treatment may be referred for these services, which are outpatient, clinic-based individual and family therapy. These services involve:
  • Individual and strategic family therapy, weekly or more often as needed, in the Gloucester Counseling Center, Warsaw Counseling Center or the Youth and Family Services office.
  • Crisis intervention services provided as needed on a 24/7 basis
  • Attendance at Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT) meetings; active collaboration with all involved agencies and other providers as needed
  • Clinical supervision provided weekly by a Licensed Professional Counselor and Licensed Clinical Psychologist; supervision provided 24/7


Who is eligible for the service?
Children who demonstrate any one of the following:
  • At risk of out-of-home placement
  • Have been referred for intensive in-home services and are awaiting those services
  • Are being discharged from intensive in-home services to intensive outpatient services
  • Are involved with the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court and need intensive outpatient treatment


Do I need a referral?
Yes. Any of the following may provide a referral to Intensive Outpatient Family Therapy Services:
  • Current therapist
  • Intensive in-home therapist
  • Court services
  • Department of Social Services
  • County Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT)
  • Psychiatric hospital (inpatient)
  • Residential treatment facility


Who pays for the service?
Medicaid, third party payers (health insurance), CSA funds, or client pay based on a sliding scale fund the service.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Rachel Teagle, M.S.
Coordinator, Intensive In-home and Outpatient Services
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

Intensive Care Coordination

How does Intensive Care Coordination work?
Intensive care coordination (ICC) is a state-funded (Comprehensive Services Act or CSA) program focused on reducing the time that children spend in residential treatment facilities. The intensive care coordinator works closely with the child in various residential facilities on becoming a viable candidate for discharge. At the same time, the intensive care coordinator also works closely with the family and community to help prepare for the child's return. ICC can also work with families and community partners to prevent residential placement.

How does it work?
If the child is placed in a residential facility, the coordinator visits the child at least twice monthly, helping the child to meet appropriate goals to ensure discharge from the facility.

The coordinator also works closely with the child’s natural supports and agencies (for example, family members, clergy, and others) within the community. A wrap-around treatment plan is established to bolster the child’s natural support network and to provide for a successful transition into the community. The coordinator also works closely with the Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT), as well as the case manager, to foster coordination between all agencies involved.

Who pays for the service?
Medicaid, third party payers (health insurance), CSA funds, or client pay based on a sliding scale fund the service.

The coordinator also works closely with the child's natural supports and agencies (for example, family members, clergy, and others) within the community. A wrap-around treatment plan is established to bolster the child's natural support network and to provide for a successful transition into the community. The coordinator also works closely with the Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT), as well as the case manager, to foster coordination between all agencies involved.

Who is eligible to receive this service?
Any child currently in a residential treatment facility or deemed at risk of entering a residential treatment facility may, upon referral, be eligible for this service. The child must be "mandated" (that is, s/he must have an IEP [Individual Education Plan], or be in foster care or at risk of out-of-home placement) and referred through local FAPTs and Community Policy and Management Teams (CPMTs) with approved CSA funds.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Scott Britton
Mental Health Care Coordinator (Child and Adolescents)
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

School-based Therapeutic Day Treatment

What are therapeutic day treatment services?
School-based mental health services are available to help children with Serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) to reach their full positive-behavior potential in the least restrictive environment.

The program helps to increase functional life skills of children whose emotional and behavioral disorders place them at risk for out-of-school and/or out-of-home placement.

Behavioral specialists provide individual and group counseling at school each day and family counseling each week.

Services also include crisis intervention and ongoing collaboration and consultation with school staff.

Who is eligible for the services?
Children under 18 who have SED with a defined serious mental illness and have behavioral and emotional problems that:
  • Interfere with learning
  • Require year-round treatment in order to sustain behavioral or emotional gains
  • Cannot be handled in a self-contained classroom for the emotionally disturbed without this programming
  • Would otherwise be placed on home-bound instruction
  • Include deficits in social skills, peer relations, or dealing with authority, are hyperactive, have poor impulse control, or are extremely depressed or marginally connected to reality
Children with SED who have at least two of the following on a continuing or intermittent basis:
  • Are at risk of hospitalization or out-of-home placement due to conflicts with the family or community
  • Need repeated interventions by mental health services or the judicial system
  • Exhibit difficulty in cognitive ability and may be unable to recognize personal danger or inappropriate social behaviors


Who pays for these services?
Medicaid and CSA funds, which are approved by the Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT) and Community Policy and Management Team (CPMT) pay for services.

What kind of services will my child receive during the school day?
Each day the child will receive at least one hour with the behavioral specialist through a combination of individual counseling, group counseling, and classroom observation/consultation with teachers and crisis intervention, as needed.

What kind of counseling does the child receive?
The child receives individual counseling at least once a week, group counseling 1-5 days per week, and family counseling at least once per week.

How can I get my child into therapeutic day treatment?
Contact your school guidance counselor or principal/assistant principal of the school that the child attends.

Will I be charged for these services?
No. The services are funded with Medicaid or CSA funds approved by the local FAPT and the CPMT.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Emily Eanes, M.S.
Coordinator, Therapeutic Day Treatment
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

Crisis Stabilization Services

When might crisis stabilization services be needed?
When might crisis stabilization services be needed? These services are most frequently employed when the child or adolescent needs an immediate clinical intervention in the least restrictive setting to lessen the impact of mental health dysfunction.

The goal is to develop and restore adaptive, stable functioning within the home, school, and/or community.

Stabilization services are sometimes used as a "step down" program for those being discharged from psychiatric facilities and returning to the community

What types of interventions do these services involve?
The service consists of clinical personnel meeting daily with the child for up to 15 consecutive days and up to 8 hours per day.

Clinicians providing crisis stabilization teach positive coping skills. The goal is to instill a sense of hope by assisting the child and family in managing the crisis, while reducing the acute emotional distress of the child or adolescent, assuring safety for the child and others.

Who is eligible for the service and who makes referrals?
Those eligible for crisis stabilization services include:
  • Children and adolescents who are experiencing acute psychiatric distress with a marked decrease in psychiatric, adaptive or behavioral functioning, or
  • Children and adolescents who are hospitalized or in other out-of-home placements pending return to the community
Outpatient therapists, emergency services staff, case managers, and/ or psychiatric staff working in close collaboration with each other and the family may provide referrals for these services.

Who pays for the service?
Fees for the service are covered under most Medicaid plans; private payment may be arranged on an individual basis, including the use of a sliding fee scale.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Scott Britton
Mental Health Care Coordinator (Child and Adolescents)
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

Case Management

What are case management services for children and adolescents?
Case management services are provided to those children/adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) (and their families) who need multiple services that require referral and coordination among a variety of providers.

Case management services may include, but are not limited to the following:
  • Provide referral to other service providers to obtain health care, housing, financial assistance, legal advice, etc.
  • Meet with the child/adolescent, their family, and other professionals to advocate, support, and collaborate on the child's/adolescent's behalf by providing supportive guidance and/or telephone and face-to-face outreach
  • Monitor progress through monthly contacts with the child/adolescent, families, and other involved service providers
Who is eligible for the services?
To be eligible for case management services, children/adolescents must be Seriously Emotionally Disturbed with a defined serious mental illness, such as bipolar disorder or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and must exhibit at least one of the following:
  • Problems in personality development and social functioning for one year or more
  • Significant problems in contrast to others of their age
  • Problems that are increasing over time
  • Have service needs that require more significant interventions over time
Children under age 7 who are at-risk of SED must meet at least one of the following criteria:
  • Exhibit behavior or maturity that is significantly different from other children their age
  • Have caregivers with predisposing factors (such as a parent with a history of major mental illness) that could result in the child developing serious emotional or behavioral problems
  • Have experienced physical or psychological stressors (such as abuse) that put them at risk of serious emotional problems
What is the benefit of case management services for my family?
Case management services assist children who are Seriously Emotionally Disturbed and their families in practical areas of daily living. For example, case managers may act as a liaison to other agency services, including medication management and therapy. A case manager can also help you to research area services providers, coordinate with other service agencies, and monitor progress toward mental health goals.

How can I access case management services?
Parents or guardians can request case management services from their outpatient therapist, who will make the referral. Those who are not currently seeing a therapist can request assistance from Emergency Services, who will schedule an intake/evaluation appointment with a mental health therapist.

Call 804.693.5057 for Gloucester Counseling Center, Ark, Virginia or
804.333.3671 for Warsaw Counseling Center, Warsaw, Virginia


Who pays for the service?
Medicaid, CSA (Comprehensive Services Act) funds secured through FAPT (Family Assessment and Planning Teams) in your county or private pay based on a sliding scale pay for the service.

Where can I find more information?
Contact: Scott Britton
Mental Health Care Coordinator (Child and Adolescents)
129 Bowden Street
Saluda, VA 23149
804.758.4035

Strategic Family Mentoring

How Does Strategic Family Mentoring Work?
Strategic Family Mentoring (SFM) works in conjunction with other Middle Peninsula-Northern Neck Community Services Board (MPNNCSB) services, such as outpatient, intensive outpatient, and intensive in-home therapy, to promote the achievement of treatment goals. For example, mentors can be extremely effective as positive role models to help the single parent family.

Mentors are individuals who are selected and hired by the MPNNCSB as part-time employees who collaborate with the therapist to assist and support the family as they work on achieving their goals.

How do mentors and therapists work together in providing treatment to my child?
Mentors monitor client/family progress and communicate observed strengths and barriers to the therapist weekly. Mentors are the therapists' "eyes and ears in the field," and the client/family "coach and cheerleader."

Mentors are not substitute parents or friends but are part of the therapeutic team to support lasting positive change. They assist the child/adolescent and family in developing the natural family and/or community supports that will help to maintain the therapeutic changes after the mentor is gone.

Who is eligible to receive SFM?
  • Children/adolescents between 5 and 17 years old with a parent(s)/guardian(s) willing to participate in SFM service. The family must reside within one of the ten counties served by the MPNNCSB. Child/adolescent must be receiving outpatient, intensive outpatient, or intensive in-home therapy from a MPNNCSB therapist.
What services are offered as part of SFM?
Mentors work with the family and therapist to:
  • Identify sustainable resources in the family/community to support healthy functioning and the achievement of treatment goals
  • Facilitate participation in appropriate social activities and connection to positive peer group
  • Support family efforts to complete assigned therapeutic tasks (such as homework) and in using strategies developed in collaboration with their therapist
  • Monitor family progress and communicate observations of progress, strengths, and barriers to goal achievement to therapist
  • Schedule outings strategically to allow parent(s) or guardian(s) time alone to address their own therapeutic tasks.
  • Reinforce and reward the child/adolescent and family efforts and progress toward change in appropriate ways
  • Engage the child in recreational and social activities, promoting social activities, while discussing effective handling of peer interactions and decision making in problems they are experiencing
Who pays for SFM services?
CSA funds approved by the county FAPT (Family Assessment and Planning Team) and the CPMT (Community Policy and Management Team) pay for SFM services.

How do I access these services?
Discuss the need for a Mentor with your therapist. S/he will submit the referral and pursue funding through FAPT. Agencies who are referring for the service should contact Rachel Teagle, YFS/Intensive In-home Coordinator (804-776-7501 Ext. 104), to obtain the referral form and schedule the SFM request for funding through FAPT.